Saturday, 6 December 2008

Read like a rabbit, think like an eagle

Last Thursday, I borrowed from the library three volumes that I needed for research. As I walked past two teenagers smoking cigarettes, one of them threw his opinion at me.

"Reading sucks!" he said. The books in my hand became heavier for a moment, but I did not bother to reply. I know better than that.

Nevertheless, the comment lingered in my mind. At night, I had a nightmare about a world without books, entertained only by high-concept movies.

My nightmare turned to be a premonition. It was meant to prepare me for my task the following day: interviewing candidates for a secretarial position.

The first candidate did take off her headphones for the interview, but she was hardly able to understand my questions. Was her mind still under the influence of the music beat?

The second candidate took a call on her mobile phone in the middle of the interview. Her boyfriend wanted to know how the interview was going. She said she was doing great. I had a different perception.

The third candidate was carrying a book, a real one. It was Stendhal's novel THE RED AND THE BLACK. I asked her if she liked the book. She replied that it was overrated, that Stendhal's other novel was much better.

She gave me reasons, she showed me logic. I guess that she had not developed her thinking abilities by watching TV. In a way, it was not fair to the other candidates.

"I read as much as a rabbit," she added with a smile. I was not aware that rabbits read so much, but I let it go at that. I was already sold.

The third candidate had a striking advantage. She was able to organize her ideas, she could think in concepts. Half-way through the interview, I concluded that she was a keeper. I made her an offer.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Tony the Misfit under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Read like a rabbit, think like an eagle

Last Thursday, I borrowed from the library three volumes that I needed for research. As I walked past two teenagers smoking cigarettes, one of them threw his opinion at me.

"Reading sucks!" he said. The books in my hand became heavier for a moment, but I did not bother to reply. I know better than that.

Nevertheless, the comment lingered in my mind. At night, I had a nightmare about a world without books, entertained only by high-concept movies.

My nightmare turned to be a premonition. It was meant to prepare me for my task the following day: interviewing candidates for a secretarial position.

The first candidate did take off her headphones for the interview, but she was hardly able to understand my questions. Was her mind still under the influence of the music beat?

The second candidate took a call on her mobile phone in the middle of the interview. Her boyfriend wanted to know how the interview was going. She said she was doing great. I had a different perception.

The third candidate was carrying a book, a real one. It was Stendhal's novel THE RED AND THE BLACK. I asked her if she liked the book. She replied that it was overrated, that Stendhal's other novel was much better.

She gave me reasons, she showed me logic. I guess that she had not developed her thinking abilities by watching TV. In a way, it was not fair to the other candidates.

"I read as much as a rabbit," she added with a smile. I was not aware that rabbits read so much, but I let it go at that. I was already sold.

The third candidate had a striking advantage. She was able to organize her ideas, she could think in concepts. Half-way through the interview, I concluded that she was a keeper. I made her an offer.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Tony the Misfit under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Lost memory, found convenience

If only I could remember everything I don't like. I wish a could make a list, so that my mind is always occupied with things I should not do.

Nevertheless, my priority at this moment is to compile an exhaustive list of all things I do not want to buy. That makes me wonder if that list should also contain the price of each item, just in case I change my mind.

Frankly, I begin to have doubts about the efficiency of spending time and energy making lists of things that I want to forget. Should I rather make a list only of things that I want to do? Of places I want to go? Like Babylon! Of goals that I want to achieve?

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]


[Image by Carla216 under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Lost memory, found convenience

If only I could remember everything I don't like. I wish a could make a list, so that my mind is always occupied with things I should not do.

Nevertheless, my priority at this moment is to compile an exhaustive list of all things I do not want to buy. That makes me wonder if that list should also contain the price of each item, just in case I change my mind.

Frankly, I begin to have doubts about the efficiency of spending time and energy making lists of things that I want to forget. Should I rather make a list only of things that I want to do? Of places I want to go? Like Babylon! Of goals that I want to achieve?

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]


[Image by Carla216 under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]