Saturday, 31 January 2009

The one recipe proven by experience


We have a saying in my home village: "Life works when you make it work." Does it sound cold-hearted, even perhaps a little cynical? After all, you could argue, each person has to deal with his own difficulties and major problems can really bring you down.

Let me bear witness of the fact that major problems will indeed bring you down sooner or later. Rare is the man who travels through life without encountering crushing adversities of one sort or another.

You cannot achieve immunity against life's difficulties, but the best approach for fighting back is purposeful action. Even if you have doubts whether your course of action is the right one, you will at least have already begun to move.

Keep your eyes open and let experience correct your course. Learning from mistakes will progressively improve the sharpness of your vision.

Continuous forward movement is bound to bring you closer to your objectives. For minor or major problems, choose the one recipe proven by experience: relentless action.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by iowa_spirit_walker under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

The one recipe proven by experience


We have a saying in my home village: "Life works when you make it work." Does it sound cold-hearted, even perhaps a little cynical? After all, you could argue, each person has to deal with his own difficulties and major problems can really bring you down.

Let me bear witness of the fact that major problems will indeed bring you down sooner or later. Rare is the man who travels through life without encountering crushing adversities of one sort or another.

You cannot achieve immunity against life's difficulties, but the best approach for fighting back is purposeful action. Even if you have doubts whether your course of action is the right one, you will at least have already begun to move.

Keep your eyes open and let experience correct your course. Learning from mistakes will progressively improve the sharpness of your vision.

Continuous forward movement is bound to bring you closer to your objectives. For minor or major problems, choose the one recipe proven by experience: relentless action.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by iowa_spirit_walker under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Friday, 30 January 2009

Look for direct and immediate benefits

How many hours per year do you spend reading newspapers? A hundred hours? From all news you read, how many items allow you to take immediate and direct action to improve your life? Less than one per cent?

Do your watch news on TV everyday? In the morning and in the evening? An hour per day makes, all in all, 366 hours per year. Do you get useful information? Do you really learn things you can act on? Do you pick up practical ideas for improving your life here and now?

Who doesn't spend an hour per day listening to the radio in the car? That makes another 366 hours per year. Do we get critical information or just
topics for making small talk? What are the direct and immediate benefits from all that listening?

Do you keep your closet full of clothes you never use? Are your shelves full of books you'll never reread? Do you pile up magazines you'll never open again?

Why do we keep things that are no longer useful? Why do we consume our time in activities that don't provide direct and immediate benefits?

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Phillie Casablanca under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Look for direct and immediate benefits

How many hours per year do you spend reading newspapers? A hundred hours? From all news you read, how many items allow you to take immediate and direct action to improve your life? Less than one per cent?

Do your watch news on TV everyday? In the morning and in the evening? An hour per day makes, all in all, 366 hours per year. Do you get useful information? Do you really learn things you can act on? Do you pick up practical ideas for improving your life here and now?

Who doesn't spend an hour per day listening to the radio in the car? That makes another 366 hours per year. Do we get critical information or just
topics for making small talk? What are the direct and immediate benefits from all that listening?

Do you keep your closet full of clothes you never use? Are your shelves full of books you'll never reread? Do you pile up magazines you'll never open again?

Why do we keep things that are no longer useful? Why do we consume our time in activities that don't provide direct and immediate benefits?

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Phillie Casablanca under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Thursday, 29 January 2009

Achieving success in a global economy


Routine and passivity won't do the trick any more when competition is coming from all directions. We have nowhere to hide in an environment where all barriers are falling. On the other hand, the sky is the limit for anyone in business today.

Each of us can muster the courage to face unpleasant truths when things turn from bad to worse. Achieving success in a global economy requires asking ourselves a few tough questions.
  1. Why am I living precisely in this place? Was that a conscious choice or the result of circumstances? Are there other places where I could be obviously happier or more successful?
  2. Am I paying more taxes than I really have to? Have I looked into alternative corporate structures for my business that could save me taxes legally? Would it be possible to reduce my taxes if I move to another place?
  3. Am I expanding my business internationally? In how many countries? How can I speed up my global expansion? Should I redesign my products in order to be able to reach additional foreign markets?
None of us possesses the perfect answer to these questions. Chinese entrepreneurs are emigrating to the US in order to establish their business here, while American graduates are now getting well-paid jobs in Shanghai almost tax-free.

There is no universally perfect business or location, but asking the right questions over and over is the best way to get 50% closer to perfect. The remaining 50% is just practice.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Subhash Chandra under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Achieving success in a global economy


Routine and passivity won't do the trick any more when competition is coming from all directions. We have nowhere to hide in an environment where all barriers are falling. On the other hand, the sky is the limit for anyone in business today.

Each of us can muster the courage to face unpleasant truths when things turn from bad to worse. Achieving success in a global economy requires asking ourselves a few tough questions.
  1. Why am I living precisely in this place? Was that a conscious choice or the result of circumstances? Are there other places where I could be obviously happier or more successful?
  2. Am I paying more taxes than I really have to? Have I looked into alternative corporate structures for my business that could save me taxes legally? Would it be possible to reduce my taxes if I move to another place?
  3. Am I expanding my business internationally? In how many countries? How can I speed up my global expansion? Should I redesign my products in order to be able to reach additional foreign markets?
None of us possesses the perfect answer to these questions. Chinese entrepreneurs are emigrating to the US in order to establish their business here, while American graduates are now getting well-paid jobs in Shanghai almost tax-free.

There is no universally perfect business or location, but asking the right questions over and over is the best way to get 50% closer to perfect. The remaining 50% is just practice.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Subhash Chandra under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Wednesday, 28 January 2009

Celebrating insensitivity to nonsense


Becoming insensitive to nonsense is a goal that should be relentlessly pursued. Your ability to think rationally in difficult situations will prove enormously beneficial over time.

The good news is that this capacity can be substantially enhanced through practice, although that takes a lot of work.

  • Do you feel compelled to react emphatically when people say something stupid?
  • Do you ever feel depressed due to the popularity of massively wrong ideas?
  • Do you get angry when you see people spreading obvious lies all over the place?
Well, don't. Your being emotionally affected serves no purpose and is a complete waste of energy. Force yourself to analyse your thoughts and clarify your ideas. Tear apart your automatic reactions and learn to shrug your shoulders instead.

You will probably never become fully comfortable around nonsense and difficulties, but if you manage to decrease your sensitivity, you will have taken an essential step towards inner peace and permanent happiness.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Marshall Flickman under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Celebrating insensitivity to nonsense


Becoming insensitive to nonsense is a goal that should be relentlessly pursued. Your ability to think rationally in difficult situations will prove enormously beneficial over time.

The good news is that this capacity can be substantially enhanced through practice, although that takes a lot of work.

  • Do you feel compelled to react emphatically when people say something stupid?
  • Do you ever feel depressed due to the popularity of massively wrong ideas?
  • Do you get angry when you see people spreading obvious lies all over the place?
Well, don't. Your being emotionally affected serves no purpose and is a complete waste of energy. Force yourself to analyse your thoughts and clarify your ideas. Tear apart your automatic reactions and learn to shrug your shoulders instead.

You will probably never become fully comfortable around nonsense and difficulties, but if you manage to decrease your sensitivity, you will have taken an essential step towards inner peace and permanent happiness.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Marshall Flickman under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Tuesday, 27 January 2009

It looks good from this angle

If you have a tendency to worry yourself sick, you won't lack opportunities these days. Did you borrow too much money? Are interest rates too high at this moment? Should you rather wait before you commit to buy a house? And if you wait, then for how long?

On the other hand, some people seem to be blessed with innate insouciance about potential catastrophes. When bad breaks do happen, like divorce or losing a good job for no reason, these people immediately get back on their feet, dust off their jackets, shrug their shoulders, and move on to the next thing.

"That job was giving me too much stress anyway," they would comment, as they open their Internet browser and begin their search for a new position. Most of us have not been born with that golden attitude, but through regular practice, we can learn to desensitize ourselves from useless worrying.

Instead of looking back, let us focus on the future. Counting our losses should be only a preparation for making a bold move towards the next profits. Let's train our eyes to look at reality from the right angle. Living is more than merely existing. The opposite of death is action.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Chris Fleming under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

It looks good from this angle

If you have a tendency to worry yourself sick, you won't lack opportunities these days. Did you borrow too much money? Are interest rates too high at this moment? Should you rather wait before you commit to buy a house? And if you wait, then for how long?

On the other hand, some people seem to be blessed with innate insouciance about potential catastrophes. When bad breaks do happen, like divorce or losing a good job for no reason, these people immediately get back on their feet, dust off their jackets, shrug their shoulders, and move on to the next thing.

"That job was giving me too much stress anyway," they would comment, as they open their Internet browser and begin their search for a new position. Most of us have not been born with that golden attitude, but through regular practice, we can learn to desensitize ourselves from useless worrying.

Instead of looking back, let us focus on the future. Counting our losses should be only a preparation for making a bold move towards the next profits. Let's train our eyes to look at reality from the right angle. Living is more than merely existing. The opposite of death is action.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Chris Fleming under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Monday, 26 January 2009

The secret of avoiding litigation

I have a friend who is continuously involved in claims and litigation. He follows every case with passion, spending what I consider a disproportionate amount of time, money, and effort in making his rights prevail.

Since I am almost never involved myself in any court case, he recently asked me for advice about how to avoid getting constantly caught in the legal maze. "There is no magic in this," I replied, "and I believe that luck plays only a minor role."

My approach is based on two simple principles that have rarely failed me:
  1. Be ready to give up minor claims, even if you are right, since the effort required to obtain compensation is out of proportion. Being alive involves making decisions and taking risks every day. If you lose a bit now and then, take it as a side effect of playing the game. It is usually better to waive a small claim than to get caught into legal entanglements.
  2. Work at improving your judgement of people. The better you are at assessing dangers and strangers, the easier you can avoid them. It rarely pays to devote your energies at trying to change people. If you have serious doubts about someone's honesty, you can save yourself a lot of trouble by not doing business with that person (let alone marrying him or her).
Anyway, if you do wish to seek compensation for damages, see if you can reach an agreement. Settling your grievance out of court will usually be most effective than going through expensive litigation.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by twoblueday under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

The secret of avoiding litigation

I have a friend who is continuously involved in claims and litigation. He follows every case with passion, spending what I consider a disproportionate amount of time, money, and effort in making his rights prevail.

Since I am almost never involved myself in any court case, he recently asked me for advice about how to avoid getting constantly caught in the legal maze. "There is no magic in this," I replied, "and I believe that luck plays only a minor role."

My approach is based on two simple principles that have rarely failed me:
  1. Be ready to give up minor claims, even if you are right, since the effort required to obtain compensation is out of proportion. Being alive involves making decisions and taking risks every day. If you lose a bit now and then, take it as a side effect of playing the game. It is usually better to waive a small claim than to get caught into legal entanglements.
  2. Work at improving your judgement of people. The better you are at assessing dangers and strangers, the easier you can avoid them. It rarely pays to devote your energies at trying to change people. If you have serious doubts about someone's honesty, you can save yourself a lot of trouble by not doing business with that person (let alone marrying him or her).
Anyway, if you do wish to seek compensation for damages, see if you can reach an agreement. Settling your grievance out of court will usually be most effective than going through expensive litigation.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by twoblueday under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Saturday, 24 January 2009

Lies I like to hear


The ability to enjoy other people's outrageous lies is an acquired skill. In most cases, that skill has to be developed together with a thick skin.
From the lies I heard this week, these eleven are the ones I enjoyed best.
  1. Singing is going to change the world. All we have to do is to sing together.
  2. Someone I've never met is coming to fix my problems.
  3. We should be proud of our origin, since it is a pure coincidence.
  4. Innovation can be ordered around.
  5. Innovation can be put on a tight schedule.
  6. We have historical debts towards long-dead people who created the basis for our present mess.
  7. Books are good, as long as you are told what to read.
  8. Ideas are good, as long as they are not controversial.
  9. Nobody is going to ask me to reimburse my debts.
  10. Being irresponsible doesn't matter.
  11. Truth is always self-evident.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by carulmare under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Lies I like to hear


The ability to enjoy other people's outrageous lies is an acquired skill. In most cases, that skill has to be developed together with a thick skin.
From the lies I heard this week, these eleven are the ones I enjoyed best.
  1. Singing is going to change the world. All we have to do is to sing together.
  2. Someone I've never met is coming to fix my problems.
  3. We should be proud of our origin, since it is a pure coincidence.
  4. Innovation can be ordered around.
  5. Innovation can be put on a tight schedule.
  6. We have historical debts towards long-dead people who created the basis for our present mess.
  7. Books are good, as long as you are told what to read.
  8. Ideas are good, as long as they are not controversial.
  9. Nobody is going to ask me to reimburse my debts.
  10. Being irresponsible doesn't matter.
  11. Truth is always self-evident.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by carulmare under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Open doors will take you places


Ideas are precious and constitute the basis of civilization. Without the concepts of free trade, freedom of speech, and human rights, our standard of living would rapidly collapse to medieval levels.

Product development, production, distribution, and marketing are based on ideas. Entrepreneurship is nothing but a sustained vision driving the transformation of existing resources into more valuable products of services.

It is only new ideas that will take you forward, personally or professionally. Closed doors reflect fear of change.


Keep you door open to new concepts and ideas. Some of them will be wrong and others will be annoying, but a few will bring about breakthrough improvements. Those few will take you places.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Fr Antunes under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Open doors will take you places


Ideas are precious and constitute the basis of civilization. Without the concepts of free trade, freedom of speech, and human rights, our standard of living would rapidly collapse to medieval levels.

Product development, production, distribution, and marketing are based on ideas. Entrepreneurship is nothing but a sustained vision driving the transformation of existing resources into more valuable products of services.

It is only new ideas that will take you forward, personally or professionally. Closed doors reflect fear of change.


Keep you door open to new concepts and ideas. Some of them will be wrong and others will be annoying, but a few will bring about breakthrough improvements. Those few will take you places.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Fr Antunes under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Friday, 23 January 2009

Prevention is often the best approach


During the past months, I have devoted time to read five popular health books. The books contain altogether hundreds of health-enhancing ideas, all falling under the principle that it is less effort to work at keeping well than trying to regain your health once you get sick.

Some recommendations from the books were contradictory or too impractical for someone leading a normal life, but I have picked up eleven ideas which looked sensible to me. I am no medical doctor and I have no clue if these recommendations will really have a positive effect, but I am ready to give them a try myself.

1. Take vitamin C.
2. Eat fruit.
3. Drink green tea.
4. Eat nuts.
5. Eat fish.
6. Walk or cycle every day.
7. Cook with extra virgin olive oil.
8. Eat skinless chicken or turkey.
9. Keep your weight stable at your optimum level.
10. Eat legumes and vegetables.
11. Use garlic, oregano, and cinnamon.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Mycael under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Prevention is often the best approach


During the past months, I have devoted time to read five popular health books. The books contain altogether hundreds of health-enhancing ideas, all falling under the principle that it is less effort to work at keeping well than trying to regain your health once you get sick.

Some recommendations from the books were contradictory or too impractical for someone leading a normal life, but I have picked up eleven ideas which looked sensible to me. I am no medical doctor and I have no clue if these recommendations will really have a positive effect, but I am ready to give them a try myself.

1. Take vitamin C.
2. Eat fruit.
3. Drink green tea.
4. Eat nuts.
5. Eat fish.
6. Walk or cycle every day.
7. Cook with extra virgin olive oil.
8. Eat skinless chicken or turkey.
9. Keep your weight stable at your optimum level.
10. Eat legumes and vegetables.
11. Use garlic, oregano, and cinnamon.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Mycael under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Wednesday, 21 January 2009

How to become a poet

An acquaintance asks me for advice about how to become a poet. No problem, I can give you some clues, but please do take your heart medication before you read this through, since it contains some strong truths.

First, you have to realize that nobody cares about what you want to be, so don't go around complaining that you are misunderstood. Artistic sensitivity is fine, but please keep it to yourself, since there is already too much noise in the world.

Second, you should just start writing your poetry and do not ask anyone for permission. If you do happen to ask someone for permission, you most likely won't even get a response. Again, it's not that most people won't understand you, it's simply that they are too busy with their own lives.

Third, you have to develop a thick skin. This is a quintessential requirement for any artist, as it is for salesmen and lawyers. People will criticize your work for no reason, editors will correct the unique syntax that you have worked so hard to create, and bookshops will place your poetry books in the cooking section.

Fourth, you have to push your work around and try to find the small percentage of people who might like your poetry. No matter how good a poet you are, that percentage will always remain small, but remember that there are 6.7 billion people in the world. Even if only one person in a thousand likes your poetry, that still makes 6.7 million people.

I know that you are going to ask me when you will know for sure that you are a poet. This is an easy question for me to answer. You will know one day in the evening, after many years of taking daily steps towards your goal.

By that time, you might be already discouraged and ready to quit poetry altogether, but take heart. On that evening, you will be invited to a party by someone you barely know. You will attend in the hope, after so many years, of meeting a publisher who will really appreciate your work.

Ten minutes after you arrive at the party, your hope will vanish. Nobody will pay any attention to you and you will wonder if you have received the invitation by error. You will retire to a corner to sip your green tea in loneliness, but then, you will realize that two young women are staring at you from the opposite side of the room.

The two will cross the room and stand still a meter away from you. "Can we ask you a question?" one of them will say. "Sure," you will reply, wondering if they are mistaking you for someone else.

"We want to become a writers," they will continue. "Could you give us some advice about how to write a book?" At that point, you will frantically try to figure out a brilliant answer, something that will identify you as a successful poet.

You will look around the room, a little desperate, realizing that you have no good advice to offer. You will wish that someone would join the conversation and give you the answer, but of course, no one will.

As you mumble your piece of advice, you will feel embarrassed by your lack of ideas and imagination. "Writing a book is easy," you will say, "you just start at the beginning and finish at the end." Then you will blush, ashamed of having spoken out such triviality.

The two women will stare at you in silence for a long time and then exchange a satisfied look. "I told you he was a poet," one of them will comment in awe.
"You were right," the other will concur. And at that moment, at that very moment, you will know yourself for sure.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Wolfgang Staudt under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

How to become a poet

An acquaintance asks me for advice about how to become a poet. No problem, I can give you some clues, but please do take your heart medication before you read this through, since it contains some strong truths.

First, you have to realize that nobody cares about what you want to be, so don't go around complaining that you are misunderstood. Artistic sensitivity is fine, but please keep it to yourself, since there is already too much noise in the world.

Second, you should just start writing your poetry and do not ask anyone for permission. If you do happen to ask someone for permission, you most likely won't even get a response. Again, it's not that most people won't understand you, it's simply that they are too busy with their own lives.

Third, you have to develop a thick skin. This is a quintessential requirement for any artist, as it is for salesmen and lawyers. People will criticize your work for no reason, editors will correct the unique syntax that you have worked so hard to create, and bookshops will place your poetry books in the cooking section.

Fourth, you have to push your work around and try to find the small percentage of people who might like your poetry. No matter how good a poet you are, that percentage will always remain small, but remember that there are 6.7 billion people in the world. Even if only one person in a thousand likes your poetry, that still makes 6.7 million people.

I know that you are going to ask me when you will know for sure that you are a poet. This is an easy question for me to answer. You will know one day in the evening, after many years of taking daily steps towards your goal.

By that time, you might be already discouraged and ready to quit poetry altogether, but take heart. On that evening, you will be invited to a party by someone you barely know. You will attend in the hope, after so many years, of meeting a publisher who will really appreciate your work.

Ten minutes after you arrive at the party, your hope will vanish. Nobody will pay any attention to you and you will wonder if you have received the invitation by error. You will retire to a corner to sip your green tea in loneliness, but then, you will realize that two young women are staring at you from the opposite side of the room.

The two will cross the room and stand still a meter away from you. "Can we ask you a question?" one of them will say. "Sure," you will reply, wondering if they are mistaking you for someone else.

"We want to become a writers," they will continue. "Could you give us some advice about how to write a book?" At that point, you will frantically try to figure out a brilliant answer, something that will identify you as a successful poet.

You will look around the room, a little desperate, realizing that you have no good advice to offer. You will wish that someone would join the conversation and give you the answer, but of course, no one will.

As you mumble your piece of advice, you will feel embarrassed by your lack of ideas and imagination. "Writing a book is easy," you will say, "you just start at the beginning and finish at the end." Then you will blush, ashamed of having spoken out such triviality.

The two women will stare at you in silence for a long time and then exchange a satisfied look. "I told you he was a poet," one of them will comment in awe.
"You were right," the other will concur. And at that moment, at that very moment, you will know yourself for sure.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Wolfgang Staudt under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Tuesday, 20 January 2009

Twenty five benefits of the economic recession


These are twenty five benefits of the economic recession. Any worsening of economic conditions will only magnify these positive aspects. Ignore the doom and gloom. These are times of great opportunity. Here is why.

  1. Shares of great companies are dirt cheap. Now it's the best time to invest.
  2. Many rental property trusts with stable cash flow and high dividends are low priced for investors.
  3. Industrial assets, such as second-hand machinery, can be purchased at deep discounts. Those assets can be immediately put to profitable use in growing economies like China.
  4. Lower rents have reduced the cost of re-locating to take up a better job.
  5. Studying has become cheaper and there is an increasing number of choices.
  6. A lower valuation of assets makes easier to discard past mistakes, to throw away what does not work, and to move on.
  7. If you live in a country with a rapidly depreciating currency, you can make good profits by simply moving your savings into a hard currency.
  8. You can enjoy deep discounts in holiday packages.
  9. Less capital is required to start up a business. If you are planning to rent retail space, you can get two months for free in some depressed areas.
  10. Travelling abroad, specially for a long-term stay, has also become cheaper. This is the ideal situation for taking up a job in a foreign country or for learning a new language.
  11. An economic recession educates children in the values of self-reliance, perseverance, and simplicity.
  12. If galloping inflation replaces depressed prices, you can benefit by investing in precious metals.
  13. A reputation of honesty and reliability becomes especially valuable in difficult economic times, since customers are unwilling to try out new suppliers.
  14. Fancy, artificial approaches will be replaced by modesty and efficiency. This trend will add value to the economy and to our lives.
  15. Less consumption means less distractions, allowing you to concentrate on what you do best.
  16. Slow sales allow time for reading, reflecting, and establishing your optimum strategy for the future.
  17. If your purchasing power is stagnant, you have no longer a reason to hang on to an occupation that does not fully satisfy you. Barriers for change have been lowered.
  18. Restaurants are cheaper. This is the best time for social activities, meeting new people, or joining clubs or associations in your areas of interest.
  19. Some businesses can be acquired for little cash. If you are willing to take the step, this is a great time to take over a business cheaply.
  20. During an economic recession, media noise becomes overwhelming. Rationality in your professional and private life becomes even more valuable.
  21. Erasing personal mistakes has become cheaper. If you are considering divorce, you could save some money now.
  22. Having the right personal habits (such as saving regularly) becomes even more profitable in an economic recession.
  23. Other people's mistakes are reported daily all over the place. This is the perfect time to learn from them and teach your children.
  24. The dark side of false heroes has become even more apparent these days. This is a great time for reinstating rational values.
  25. An economic recession multiplies the value of a long-term vision in any endeavour. Time can grow today's cheap investment or training into a great future success.
[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by adamsofen under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Twenty five benefits of the economic recession


These are twenty five benefits of the economic recession. Any worsening of economic conditions will only magnify these positive aspects. Ignore the doom and gloom. These are times of great opportunity. Here is why.

  1. Shares of great companies are dirt cheap. Now it's the best time to invest.
  2. Many rental property trusts with stable cash flow and high dividends are low priced for investors.
  3. Industrial assets, such as second-hand machinery, can be purchased at deep discounts. Those assets can be immediately put to profitable use in growing economies like China.
  4. Lower rents have reduced the cost of re-locating to take up a better job.
  5. Studying has become cheaper and there is an increasing number of choices.
  6. A lower valuation of assets makes easier to discard past mistakes, to throw away what does not work, and to move on.
  7. If you live in a country with a rapidly depreciating currency, you can make good profits by simply moving your savings into a hard currency.
  8. You can enjoy deep discounts in holiday packages.
  9. Less capital is required to start up a business. If you are planning to rent retail space, you can get two months for free in some depressed areas.
  10. Travelling abroad, specially for a long-term stay, has also become cheaper. This is the ideal situation for taking up a job in a foreign country or for learning a new language.
  11. An economic recession educates children in the values of self-reliance, perseverance, and simplicity.
  12. If galloping inflation replaces depressed prices, you can benefit by investing in precious metals.
  13. A reputation of honesty and reliability becomes especially valuable in difficult economic times, since customers are unwilling to try out new suppliers.
  14. Fancy, artificial approaches will be replaced by modesty and efficiency. This trend will add value to the economy and to our lives.
  15. Less consumption means less distractions, allowing you to concentrate on what you do best.
  16. Slow sales allow time for reading, reflecting, and establishing your optimum strategy for the future.
  17. If your purchasing power is stagnant, you have no longer a reason to hang on to an occupation that does not fully satisfy you. Barriers for change have been lowered.
  18. Restaurants are cheaper. This is the best time for social activities, meeting new people, or joining clubs or associations in your areas of interest.
  19. Some businesses can be acquired for little cash. If you are willing to take the step, this is a great time to take over a business cheaply.
  20. During an economic recession, media noise becomes overwhelming. Rationality in your professional and private life becomes even more valuable.
  21. Erasing personal mistakes has become cheaper. If you are considering divorce, you could save some money now.
  22. Having the right personal habits (such as saving regularly) becomes even more profitable in an economic recession.
  23. Other people's mistakes are reported daily all over the place. This is the perfect time to learn from them and teach your children.
  24. The dark side of false heroes has become even more apparent these days. This is a great time for reinstating rational values.
  25. An economic recession multiplies the value of a long-term vision in any endeavour. Time can grow today's cheap investment or training into a great future success.
[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by adamsofen under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Monday, 19 January 2009

Help has arrived


Samuel Beckett's play "Waiting for Godot" (1953) presents the story of two men endlessly discussing about someone called Godot, who is supposedly coming to help them. The two characters in the play place their hopes in Godot's coming and speculate about what their lives will look like after help has arrived.

What makes Beckett's play so compelling is that it is so realistic. How much time do we all spend hoping for someone to come and fix this or that problem? Who doesn't love to fantasize about easy solutions that will be put in place when help finally arrives?

More than fifty years have gone by since the première of Beckett's play and Godot has not arrived. Newspapers, TV, and radio have not given up, since they are still announcing daily that someone is coming to fix our problems, whether financial, professional, or personal.

I have seen Beckett's play again recently and the two men are still waiting for Godot, still discussing their hopes.
To tell you the truth, I don't know if Godot will be finally coming to save the day.

In the meantime, I have adopted another strategy that does not require so much waiting. A friend told me a few years ago that, if you know where to look, you will realize that help has already arrived and that it is readily available. "Where?" I asked surprised. My friend shrugged his shoulders and smiled. "In the mirror," he replied.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by fazen under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Help has arrived


Samuel Beckett's play "Waiting for Godot" (1953) presents the story of two men endlessly discussing about someone called Godot, who is supposedly coming to help them. The two characters in the play place their hopes in Godot's coming and speculate about what their lives will look like after help has arrived.

What makes Beckett's play so compelling is that it is so realistic. How much time do we all spend hoping for someone to come and fix this or that problem? Who doesn't love to fantasize about easy solutions that will be put in place when help finally arrives?

More than fifty years have gone by since the première of Beckett's play and Godot has not arrived. Newspapers, TV, and radio have not given up, since they are still announcing daily that someone is coming to fix our problems, whether financial, professional, or personal.

I have seen Beckett's play again recently and the two men are still waiting for Godot, still discussing their hopes.
To tell you the truth, I don't know if Godot will be finally coming to save the day.

In the meantime, I have adopted another strategy that does not require so much waiting. A friend told me a few years ago that, if you know where to look, you will realize that help has already arrived and that it is readily available. "Where?" I asked surprised. My friend shrugged his shoulders and smiled. "In the mirror," he replied.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by fazen under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Sunday, 18 January 2009

The princess who had no birthday


Amongst all young women in the kingdom, princess Ameline possessed the blondest hair, the bluest eyes, and the saddest heart.

Her parents, the late King and Queen, had entrusted her to a convent for her education years ago, so long ago that nobody could remember.

Ameline was not a good student and, instead of repeating litanies with the other novices, she had taken up the habit of scurrying out of the convent to play in the nearby woods.

One Tuesday afternoon, barbarians attacked the convent, killed all nuns and novices, stole all cookies, and went away. When Ameline returned to the convent, she found herself to be the only survivor of the massacre.

She left the convent, walked to the city, and went directly to the Royal Palace, which she found empty, except for an old man who made his living guiding tourists.
"Where are the barons and the servants?" inquired Ameline.

The old man examined attentively her face and smiled. "You are princess Ameline," he said. "I have not seen you for a long time." He explained to Ameline that, after the King's and Queen's death many years ago, the kingdom administration had decayed into oblivion and finally vanished altogether. "Nevertheless, the palace is yours," he went on, "as well as the gold in the caves."

Ameline started a new life and began to live like real princess. Even though she was overall respected, she lacked one essential thing and that deprivation made her deeply unhappy: Ameline had no birthday.

Hardly a week went by without Ameline being invited to this or that birthday party. Everybody in the kingdom had his own birthday, that is, everybody except Ameline. At night, she dreamed of having her own birthday party and cake, but that was not to be.

Ameline's parents were dead, as well as the nuns in the convent. How could she possibly find out on which precise day she had been born? What is even worse, Ameline had no clue about how old she was. As time passed, she grew more and more depressed about her deficiency.

How could she ever be sure if she was old enough to marry? What if she ever wanted to sell her palace? How would she prove to the notary that she was of age? The old man, whom Ameline had allowed to continue his job as tourist guide in the palace, saw the princess whither away and decided to have a talk with her.

"My situation is hopeless and no one can help me," Ameline explained to him. "It would have been better if I had died in the convent." The old man listened attentively to Ameline's troubles and shook his head. "You are mistaken to think that you are the only one who has no birthday," he replied.

The princess was surprised to hear that. Was the old man lying in order to comfort her? "That's not true," she countered irritated. "I have seen everybody having birthday parties."

The old man nodded. "When the kingdom administration disappeared, the birthday registry turned to dust, and nobody was any longer certain about his own birthday. That created some disorientation, but after a while, people shrugged their shoulders and began to throw birthday parties whenever they saw fit. Sometimes twice per year, often twice per week."

The princess stared at the old man for a long moment, until she seized the full meaning of his words. Then she went to the palace kitchen and gave orders to prepare her a dozen birthday parties. She had a lot to catch up with.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Ruabag under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

The princess who had no birthday


Amongst all young women in the kingdom, princess Ameline possessed the blondest hair, the bluest eyes, and the saddest heart.

Her parents, the late King and Queen, had entrusted her to a convent for her education years ago, so long ago that nobody could remember.

Ameline was not a good student and, instead of repeating litanies with the other novices, she had taken up the habit of scurrying out of the convent to play in the nearby woods.

One Tuesday afternoon, barbarians attacked the convent, killed all nuns and novices, stole all cookies, and went away. When Ameline returned to the convent, she found herself to be the only survivor of the massacre.

She left the convent, walked to the city, and went directly to the Royal Palace, which she found empty, except for an old man who made his living guiding tourists.
"Where are the barons and the servants?" inquired Ameline.

The old man examined attentively her face and smiled. "You are princess Ameline," he said. "I have not seen you for a long time." He explained to Ameline that, after the King's and Queen's death many years ago, the kingdom administration had decayed into oblivion and finally vanished altogether. "Nevertheless, the palace is yours," he went on, "as well as the gold in the caves."

Ameline started a new life and began to live like real princess. Even though she was overall respected, she lacked one essential thing and that deprivation made her deeply unhappy: Ameline had no birthday.

Hardly a week went by without Ameline being invited to this or that birthday party. Everybody in the kingdom had his own birthday, that is, everybody except Ameline. At night, she dreamed of having her own birthday party and cake, but that was not to be.

Ameline's parents were dead, as well as the nuns in the convent. How could she possibly find out on which precise day she had been born? What is even worse, Ameline had no clue about how old she was. As time passed, she grew more and more depressed about her deficiency.

How could she ever be sure if she was old enough to marry? What if she ever wanted to sell her palace? How would she prove to the notary that she was of age? The old man, whom Ameline had allowed to continue his job as tourist guide in the palace, saw the princess whither away and decided to have a talk with her.

"My situation is hopeless and no one can help me," Ameline explained to him. "It would have been better if I had died in the convent." The old man listened attentively to Ameline's troubles and shook his head. "You are mistaken to think that you are the only one who has no birthday," he replied.

The princess was surprised to hear that. Was the old man lying in order to comfort her? "That's not true," she countered irritated. "I have seen everybody having birthday parties."

The old man nodded. "When the kingdom administration disappeared, the birthday registry turned to dust, and nobody was any longer certain about his own birthday. That created some disorientation, but after a while, people shrugged their shoulders and began to throw birthday parties whenever they saw fit. Sometimes twice per year, often twice per week."

The princess stared at the old man for a long moment, until she seized the full meaning of his words. Then she went to the palace kitchen and gave orders to prepare her a dozen birthday parties. She had a lot to catch up with.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Ruabag under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Saturday, 17 January 2009

Where value is to be found

"I need time to think," said Martin Sonner. "I'm going away for a week." Martin's boss looked at his best salesman with understanding.

"If you are going to take a holiday, this is the best time." That was true, since no customer had set foot in the car dealership during the last ten days.

It was as though the desire to buy a new car had been suddenly erased from the memory of millions of people. Due to the economic crisis, car sales had dropped 30%.

If the situation did not improve during the next months, Martin's boss might be forced to shut down the business. The car dealership was not generating enough cash even to pay the rent.

Martin told his wife that he had to travel to a sales conference, packed a small suitcase, went to the airport, and took the first flight to Cairo. The plane landed in Egypt eight hours later. Martin took a room in a hotel near the pyramids.

The next day, he walked around the pyramids, climbed to the top, descended, and climbed again. On his second day, he went inside the Great Pyramid, where he found only empty rooms and rarefied air. He woke up in the middle of the second night and was unable to fall asleep again.

It was too warm in his hotel room and, besides, a question was bothering him. He got dressed, went out of the hotel, and walked towards the pyramids. Then he left the road, took off his shoes, and walked on the desert sand.

Even at night, the sand was still warm from the previous day's sunshine. Martin stood still in front of the Great Pyramid and took in a deep breath. The problems of the car dealership were now far away from his mind.

A different subject was troubling Martin. What was the point of building pyramids? Why had ancient Egyptians not put their efforts in more useful things? Indeed, it had taken five thousand years for the pyramids to bring tourists to Egypt in substantial numbers.

Martin stared at the stone blocks for several hours, as the night came to an end. The first light of dawn made him close his eyes. There has never been any good reason to build pyramids, he concluded. Pyramids are useless. Maybe that's why people like them: pyramids are a reminder that you should not spend your life piling stone blocks for no useful purpose.

When Martin returned to the car dealership at the end of the week, his boss welcomed him warmly. He was glad to have his best salesman back. "Did you come up with a brilliant sales strategy while you were in Egypt?" Martin's boss asked, half-jokingly, half-desperately. "Did you get any idea about how to turn around the situation?"

Martin nodded and handed in his resignation. "As a matter of fact, I did," he replied. "I have learned that you can wait a long time for pyramids to pay off. Too long." A few days later, Martin found a sales job in a growing field. It was a company that sold turn-key factories in the Middle-East. A booming business.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by vilpedo under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Friday, 16 January 2009

Times of maximum despondency

My brief advice about how to filter or ignore depressing reports in newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and on-line media.
  1. Don't take it personally if people do stupid things
  2. Ignore gloomy predictions: the world is not going to end
  3. What looks malignant and universal is usually benign and local
  4. Many horror news contain the seed of immensely profitable investments
  5. When people give up, that's the time to acquire assets dirt cheap
  6. A crisis, personal or otherwise, is better faced through relentless initiative
  7. What looks like a lot of money today has often little long-term significance
  8. Opportunities are created every minute, at least for those who are looking
  9. Nobody but you can decide when a game is over
  10. Creativity and strength of character are built from what you learn on bad days
If you want to gain perspective, there is nothing like reading history. Learn from the past to establish your best strategy for the future. Today, as it has always been the case, times of maximum despondency are times of maximum opportunity.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by timheyer under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Times of maximum despondency

My brief advice about how to filter or ignore depressing reports in newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and on-line media.
  1. Don't take it personally if people do stupid things
  2. Ignore gloomy predictions: the world is not going to end
  3. What looks malignant and universal is usually benign and local
  4. Many horror news contain the seed of immensely profitable investments
  5. When people give up, that's the time to acquire assets dirt cheap
  6. A crisis, personal or otherwise, is better faced through relentless initiative
  7. What looks like a lot of money today has often little long-term significance
  8. Opportunities are created every minute, at least for those who are looking
  9. Nobody but you can decide when a game is over
  10. Creativity and strength of character are built from what you learn on bad days
If you want to gain perspective, there is nothing like reading history. Learn from the past to establish your best strategy for the future. Today, as it has always been the case, times of maximum despondency are times of maximum opportunity.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by timheyer under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Thursday, 15 January 2009

Slow is good


For important things, there is always sufficient time. Slowness is an essential attribute of many great things, like cooking or relationships. It makes no sense to put pressure on the wrong places. Some things take as long as they take. Such slowness is to be enjoyed, not frivolously discarded as a waste of time.

Babies take nine months. Lentils take twenty minutes. You'd better bake potatoes slowly if you don't want to burn them. Substantial skills, like learning a foreign language, need months or years. There is plenty of time for important things. If you think that's not the case, check your priorities and simplify your life.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by cliff1066 under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Slow is good


For important things, there is always sufficient time. Slowness is an essential attribute of many great things, like cooking or relationships. It makes no sense to put pressure on the wrong places. Some things take as long as they take. Such slowness is to be enjoyed, not frivolously discarded as a waste of time.

Babies take nine months. Lentils take twenty minutes. You'd better bake potatoes slowly if you don't want to burn them. Substantial skills, like learning a foreign language, need months or years. There is plenty of time for important things. If you think that's not the case, check your priorities and simplify your life.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by cliff1066 under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Wednesday, 14 January 2009

Let's try something new


The readiness to try new things or new approaches is essential for long-term success. The fearless innovator has gone through the experience of failure on several occasions by the time the cautious conservative starts to consider the possibility of change.

In all fields, learning requires making mistakes, usually lots of them, until you acquire the skills, contacts, or expertise necessary to achieve your objectives. Paying too much attention to initial failures is bound to slow down your progress.

Beginner's mistakes are part of the natural learning curve in any endeavour, professional or otherwise. Detailed, valuable knowledge can only be acquired by actual playing on the field. So make sure to get in there as soon as you can. Then the clock starts to tick in your favour.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by wwarby under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Let's try something new


The readiness to try new things or new approaches is essential for long-term success. The fearless innovator has gone through the experience of failure on several occasions by the time the cautious conservative starts to consider the possibility of change.

In all fields, learning requires making mistakes, usually lots of them, until you acquire the skills, contacts, or expertise necessary to achieve your objectives. Paying too much attention to initial failures is bound to slow down your progress.

Beginner's mistakes are part of the natural learning curve in any endeavour, professional or otherwise. Detailed, valuable knowledge can only be acquired by actual playing on the field. So make sure to get in there as soon as you can. Then the clock starts to tick in your favour.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by wwarby under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Tuesday, 13 January 2009

More access to opportunities


Before the financial crisis, it used to be costly to move to another city or country in order to take a new job. Thanks to the latest developments, the cost of housing, whether buying or renting, has been greatly reduced in many areas of the world.

If you want to change jobs, if you want to explore new opportunities, there has never been a better time. Even if you decide to move only for a short while, you can now rent a furnished apartment cheaply in many cities. The cost of moving to a new place will not be stopping you from pursuing your dreams.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by tukanuk under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

More access to opportunities


Before the financial crisis, it used to be costly to move to another city or country in order to take a new job. Thanks to the latest developments, the cost of housing, whether buying or renting, has been greatly reduced in many areas of the world.

If you want to change jobs, if you want to explore new opportunities, there has never been a better time. Even if you decide to move only for a short while, you can now rent a furnished apartment cheaply in many cities. The cost of moving to a new place will not be stopping you from pursuing your dreams.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by tukanuk under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Monday, 12 January 2009

What I learned from a great salesman


Eugene is the best salesman I've ever met. He is of Russian origin and totally unassuming. He is not an all-enthusiastic type full of fluffy slogans that wear you down. He never annoys customers with too much talk, he prefers to listen.

My attempts to have Eugene reveal his secret to me have always met with a look of incomprehension from his side. "I have no secret," he told me over and over. "I just listen to people and give them what they want."

It took me years to understand the wisdom behind Eugene's simple formula. Good, solid salesmanship is not about manipulation, it's about integrity. The point is not imposing your view on others, but making sure that you meet their needs. If you get that right, you've got it made.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by _neona_ under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

What I learned from a great salesman


Eugene is the best salesman I've ever met. He is of Russian origin and totally unassuming. He is not an all-enthusiastic type full of fluffy slogans that wear you down. He never annoys customers with too much talk, he prefers to listen.

My attempts to have Eugene reveal his secret to me have always met with a look of incomprehension from his side. "I have no secret," he told me over and over. "I just listen to people and give them what they want."

It took me years to understand the wisdom behind Eugene's simple formula. Good, solid salesmanship is not about manipulation, it's about integrity. The point is not imposing your view on others, but making sure that you meet their needs. If you get that right, you've got it made.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by _neona_ under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Saturday, 10 January 2009

The sunny side of the economic recession

I have good news for you. In case nobody told you yet, there is a sunny side to the recession. Many consumer and business products are dirt cheap and might stay so for a while. We might not see this kind of prices any more in our lifetime.

The media are reporting this situation as a reason for falling into apathy and despair. Will you allow me a few minutes of your time to express a different view? I believe that we are facing the opportunity of the century.

If runaway inflation is coming, let's ask ourselves how we can benefit from the price surge. If major shifts are taking place in mature industrial markets, let's ask ourselves how we can profit from the wild ride.

Economics teaches us to look beyond the obvious and think beyond immediacy. Social discomfort is often a by-product of figuring out the less visible consequences of human action, but those who try it once usually find it so fulfilling that will not consider any other option in the future.

Should we spend our time crying about how bad things are? Does it not make more sense to seek out ways to make the best of it? What we perceive today as a hopeless mess might be regarded
fifteen years from now as the decisive turn of the road, for the better.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by René Ehrhardt under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

The sunny side of the economic recession

I have good news for you. In case nobody told you yet, there is a sunny side to the recession. Many consumer and business products are dirt cheap and might stay so for a while. We might not see this kind of prices any more in our lifetime.

The media are reporting this situation as a reason for falling into apathy and despair. Will you allow me a few minutes of your time to express a different view? I believe that we are facing the opportunity of the century.

If runaway inflation is coming, let's ask ourselves how we can benefit from the price surge. If major shifts are taking place in mature industrial markets, let's ask ourselves how we can profit from the wild ride.

Economics teaches us to look beyond the obvious and think beyond immediacy. Social discomfort is often a by-product of figuring out the less visible consequences of human action, but those who try it once usually find it so fulfilling that will not consider any other option in the future.

Should we spend our time crying about how bad things are? Does it not make more sense to seek out ways to make the best of it? What we perceive today as a hopeless mess might be regarded
fifteen years from now as the decisive turn of the road, for the better.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by René Ehrhardt under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

The essential factor

The passion to turn a product or service into a commercial success is the essential factor that determines the future of a new enterprise. Mistakes are inevitable, no matter how old and experienced the entrepreneur. This is why passion entails flexibility and resiliency.

Is the selling price too high or too low? Are the distribution channels adequate for the product? Should the packaging be improved? What happens if we run out of money? To all these and other questions, the relentless passion of the entrepreneur is already weighing alternative answers.

Lack of capital won't stop the dream, nor lack of contacts, nor massive ridicule. History shows the same story again and again. Scepticism does not need to turn to discouragement. Resistance and difficulties do not need to hit the ship under the waterline. Determination is the essential factor. Let it carry the day.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by chadh under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

The essential factor

The passion to turn a product or service into a commercial success is the essential factor that determines the future of a new enterprise. Mistakes are inevitable, no matter how old and experienced the entrepreneur. This is why passion entails flexibility and resiliency.

Is the selling price too high or too low? Are the distribution channels adequate for the product? Should the packaging be improved? What happens if we run out of money? To all these and other questions, the relentless passion of the entrepreneur is already weighing alternative answers.

Lack of capital won't stop the dream, nor lack of contacts, nor massive ridicule. History shows the same story again and again. Scepticism does not need to turn to discouragement. Resistance and difficulties do not need to hit the ship under the waterline. Determination is the essential factor. Let it carry the day.


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by chadh under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Friday, 9 January 2009

You have better things to do

You have better things to do than:
  • expecting free help to come from nowhere
  • letting other people determine your values and priorities
  • being rushed into making important commitments
  • surrendering your rights in exchange of nothing
You know better than:
  • imitating others instead of doing what you want to do
  • taking what is immediately available without bothering to look further
  • being overwhelmed by other people's opinion or lack of it
  • wasting your time trying to establish paradise on earth
So do not hesitate to:
  • discard old things that do not work and try new things instead
  • preserve your own time as something to be used as you wish
  • walk away from situations where people tell you that you have no choice
  • do what is right and true even if when it is unpopular

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Tempo no tempo (no video) under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/]

You have better things to do

You have better things to do than:
  • expecting free help to come from nowhere
  • letting other people determine your values and priorities
  • being rushed into making important commitments
  • surrendering your rights in exchange of nothing
You know better than:
  • imitating others instead of doing what you want to do
  • taking what is immediately available without bothering to look further
  • being overwhelmed by other people's opinion or lack of it
  • wasting your time trying to establish paradise on earth
So do not hesitate to:
  • discard old things that do not work and try new things instead
  • preserve your own time as something to be used as you wish
  • walk away from situations where people tell you that you have no choice
  • do what is right and true even if when it is unpopular

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Tempo no tempo (no video) under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/]