Monday, 19 January 2009

Help has arrived


Samuel Beckett's play "Waiting for Godot" (1953) presents the story of two men endlessly discussing about someone called Godot, who is supposedly coming to help them. The two characters in the play place their hopes in Godot's coming and speculate about what their lives will look like after help has arrived.

What makes Beckett's play so compelling is that it is so realistic. How much time do we all spend hoping for someone to come and fix this or that problem? Who doesn't love to fantasize about easy solutions that will be put in place when help finally arrives?

More than fifty years have gone by since the première of Beckett's play and Godot has not arrived. Newspapers, TV, and radio have not given up, since they are still announcing daily that someone is coming to fix our problems, whether financial, professional, or personal.

I have seen Beckett's play again recently and the two men are still waiting for Godot, still discussing their hopes.
To tell you the truth, I don't know if Godot will be finally coming to save the day.

In the meantime, I have adopted another strategy that does not require so much waiting. A friend told me a few years ago that, if you know where to look, you will realize that help has already arrived and that it is readily available. "Where?" I asked surprised. My friend shrugged his shoulders and smiled. "In the mirror," he replied.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by fazen under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Help has arrived


Samuel Beckett's play "Waiting for Godot" (1953) presents the story of two men endlessly discussing about someone called Godot, who is supposedly coming to help them. The two characters in the play place their hopes in Godot's coming and speculate about what their lives will look like after help has arrived.

What makes Beckett's play so compelling is that it is so realistic. How much time do we all spend hoping for someone to come and fix this or that problem? Who doesn't love to fantasize about easy solutions that will be put in place when help finally arrives?

More than fifty years have gone by since the première of Beckett's play and Godot has not arrived. Newspapers, TV, and radio have not given up, since they are still announcing daily that someone is coming to fix our problems, whether financial, professional, or personal.

I have seen Beckett's play again recently and the two men are still waiting for Godot, still discussing their hopes.
To tell you the truth, I don't know if Godot will be finally coming to save the day.

In the meantime, I have adopted another strategy that does not require so much waiting. A friend told me a few years ago that, if you know where to look, you will realize that help has already arrived and that it is readily available. "Where?" I asked surprised. My friend shrugged his shoulders and smiled. "In the mirror," he replied.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by fazen under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]