Tuesday, 10 February 2009

The deepest fear comes always in the morning

I am a scientist of a kind that is rarely talked about. My field of expertise is neither chemistry nor astronomy. Even at the beginning of my studies, I found those subjects too limited, too simple and mechanistic.

"You will never go far if you choose fear as a study subject," I was told over and over when I was a young student. Those who warned me were wrong, but I thank them for discouraging competition in my field.

Did you know that fear-related products constitute 13% of our economy? The demand for my services has only grown stronger with time, n
o matter how often I raise my fees.

"You can only catch big fish by getting into deep waters," my father's advice still resonates in my ears. How true, I reflect every morning as I set up my camera next to the highway.

My video e
quipment is itself not expensive, but the way I use it makes it unique. My steel tripod allows me perfect pointing accuracy. Artificial lighting is unnecessary, since the deepest fear comes always in the morning.

I look at the drivers in the passing cars and I smile. I might fail to read the fear in their eyes, but my camera won't. My computer will turn digital images into statistical data and draw me a simple curve. The fear curve.

Today was a good day. I have found another hot spot in the highway. Why does the fear curve climb precisely at this turn of the road? Who knows. There are so many good reasons.

Those who are driving by might be workers about to be fired from a nearby factory. They might be cancer patients awaiting the result of a test. Or investors fearing a crashing stock market or simply parents worried about their children.

I have found another ideal location for billboards promoting drugs against anxiety, but
this time, I won't be telling any pharmaceutical company about this spot on the highway. I am thankful that I no longer need the money and I am fully devoted to my mission.

"Check the land registry and find out who owns this parcel," I instruct my lawyer on the phone. "Get me a lease to put up a sign."

It's the fifth billboard that I put up this month on a fear spot. Most drivers won't read my message and, from the few who read it, most will ignore it. I don't mind.


I am a scientist and I trust statistics. I know that one or two persons will read my text and change their course.
I call up my carpenter and command a new billboard with my usual text. "Fear is paralysis. Take action."

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Skyriser Lix under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

The deepest fear comes always in the morning

I am a scientist of a kind that is rarely talked about. My field of expertise is neither chemistry nor astronomy. Even at the beginning of my studies, I found those subjects too limited, too simple and mechanistic.

"You will never go far if you choose fear as a study subject," I was told over and over when I was a young student. Those who warned me were wrong, but I thank them for discouraging competition in my field.

Did you know that fear-related products constitute 13% of our economy? The demand for my services has only grown stronger with time, n
o matter how often I raise my fees.

"You can only catch big fish by getting into deep waters," my father's advice still resonates in my ears. How true, I reflect every morning as I set up my camera next to the highway.

My video e
quipment is itself not expensive, but the way I use it makes it unique. My steel tripod allows me perfect pointing accuracy. Artificial lighting is unnecessary, since the deepest fear comes always in the morning.

I look at the drivers in the passing cars and I smile. I might fail to read the fear in their eyes, but my camera won't. My computer will turn digital images into statistical data and draw me a simple curve. The fear curve.

Today was a good day. I have found another hot spot in the highway. Why does the fear curve climb precisely at this turn of the road? Who knows. There are so many good reasons.

Those who are driving by might be workers about to be fired from a nearby factory. They might be cancer patients awaiting the result of a test. Or investors fearing a crashing stock market or simply parents worried about their children.

I have found another ideal location for billboards promoting drugs against anxiety, but
this time, I won't be telling any pharmaceutical company about this spot on the highway. I am thankful that I no longer need the money and I am fully devoted to my mission.

"Check the land registry and find out who owns this parcel," I instruct my lawyer on the phone. "Get me a lease to put up a sign."

It's the fifth billboard that I put up this month on a fear spot. Most drivers won't read my message and, from the few who read it, most will ignore it. I don't mind.


I am a scientist and I trust statistics. I know that one or two persons will read my text and change their course.
I call up my carpenter and command a new billboard with my usual text. "Fear is paralysis. Take action."

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Skyriser Lix under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]