Tuesday, 10 November 2009

Waiting for the world to change is a waste of time (Part 3 of 3)


“In the Dark Ages, ancient statutes were broken and melted by unfeeling avarice,” noted Gibbon. “The soul of geniuses who had shaped them evaporated in smoke. The cost and labour of centuries were consumed in a moment. Of the writings of Antiquity that still existed at that time, many were lost forever.”

After the fall of the Roman Empire, injustice and evil took over the world during hundreds of years. There was little that individuals could undertake against the tidal wave of ignorance and violence that swept entire continents. Those who tried to resist were wiped out. The productive capacities of whole populations were destroyed and life expectancy sharply decreased.

Despite those difficulties, a small minority survived and thrived in the Dark Ages. New agricultural methods were developed and land productivity doubled. The innovation of using cork stoppers in bottles created a mass-market for wine. In the quietness of monasteries, Greek and Latin books were translated into modern languages, preparing the transition from the Dark Ages to the Renaissance.

History never follows a line of steady progress where all things become increasingly better. Each century is shaped by conflicting forces. Trusting that the world always turns better with time is an unrealistic point of view.

The passage of time does not guarantee that knowledge will be preserved. Many skills and techniques have been lost and forgotten through the centuries. Mistakes of the past are likely to be repeated. Expecting the world to change necessarily for the better is a pleasant fantasy which contradicts the facts of History.

Believing in myths never yields good results because it inhibits individuals from taking action to improve their own situation. Check facts, ask questions, and find out what things are really like. If prospects don't look good, that might be a signal for you to change direction.

Look at reality with a fresh view, draw your own conclusions, and discard unfounded hopes. “The false application of the maxims of Antiquity is the source of many disappointments,” concluded Gibbon. “One should never overlook the differences in time and characters.”

Look ahead and decide if you like what you see. If you don't, take measures to protect yourself and improve your prospects. Waiting for the world to change is a waste of time. Make sound choices and play your cards wisely. There are plenty of things that you can do to make your future brighter.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by novocortex under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Waiting for the world to change is a waste of time
(Part 3 of 3)


“In the Dark Ages, ancient statutes were broken and melted by unfeeling avarice,” noted Gibbon. “The soul of geniuses who had shaped them evaporated in smoke. The cost and labour of centuries were consumed in a moment. Of the writings of Antiquity that still existed at that time, many were lost forever.”

After the fall of the Roman Empire, injustice and evil took over the world during hundreds of years. There was little that individuals could undertake against the tidal wave of ignorance and violence that swept entire continents. Those who tried to resist were wiped out. The productive capacities of whole populations were destroyed and life expectancy sharply decreased.

Despite those difficulties, a small minority survived and thrived in the Dark Ages. New agricultural methods were developed and land productivity doubled. The innovation of using cork stoppers in bottles created a mass-market for wine. In the quietness of monasteries, Greek and Latin books were translated into modern languages, preparing the transition from the Dark Ages to the Renaissance.

History never follows a line of steady progress where all things become increasingly better. Each century is shaped by conflicting forces. Trusting that the world always turns better with time is an unrealistic point of view.

The passage of time does not guarantee that knowledge will be preserved. Many skills and techniques have been lost and forgotten through the centuries. Mistakes of the past are likely to be repeated. Expecting the world to change necessarily for the better is a pleasant fantasy which contradicts the facts of History.

Believing in myths never yields good results because it inhibits individuals from taking action to improve their own situation. Check facts, ask questions, and find out what things are really like. If prospects don't look good, that might be a signal for you to change direction.

Look at reality with a fresh view, draw your own conclusions, and discard unfounded hopes. “The false application of the maxims of Antiquity is the source of many disappointments,” concluded Gibbon. “One should never overlook the differences in time and characters.”

Look ahead and decide if you like what you see. If you don't, take measures to protect yourself and improve your prospects. Waiting for the world to change is a waste of time. Make sound choices and play your cards wisely. There are plenty of things that you can do to make your future brighter.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by novocortex under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]