Tuesday, 12 January 2010

The discovery of effective truths (Part 2 of 3)


It takes a strong will and massive efforts to modify the way we eat. On many occasions, men and women undertake such changes only as a last resort; for instance, after having suffered a heart attack or being diagnosed with cancer.

Embracing a better diet becomes a major challenge when individuals endure constant social pressure to behave irresponsibility. At the time of this writing, business meetings in Russia are still being closed with rounds of vodka. When colleagues and customers push you to drink, it is very difficult to resist. How many of those people ignore the negative consequences of their actions?

Sweet are the lies that appeal to our vanity, but their charms do not make them less destructive. Misrepresentations can be pleasant and enticing despite their lethal consequences. Inferior food and excessive alcohol consumption undermine our health. Sugar-coated falsehoods sabotage our interests and place heavy burdens on our shoulders.

Seductive lies bring about perverse effects, from which the loss of personal autonomy is by far the worst. The bigger the falsehood, the less that will remain of your independence. If you subscribe to misrepresentations, they will erode your entrepreneurial abilities. You will forsake your initiative and become psychologically dependent. These are four examples of how to replace sweet lies by effective truths:

[1] Misplaced hope should make way for initiative: Do you ever tell yourself that someone, somewhere is going to recognize your talent? The sweet lie is that good things happen to those who wait long enough. The effective truth is that, if your talents are underutilized, you'd better take action to promote them. It is up to you to improve your situation.

To be continued in Part 3

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by un punto in movimiento under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]