Sunday, 21 March 2010

Why Latin is a dead language: a practical lesson from History (Part 5 of 5)


Trying to maintain Latin alive was the quintessential dead-end project. Relatively few people were willing to devote resources to the undertaking; its cost far exceeded the capital available. The project was doomed from the start; those who believed that it could succeed were massively unrealistic.

The ancient language did not die the glorious death of a heroic medieval knight; it perished from starvation and neglect. Its structural inefficiency rendered it unable to compete. History broke it down and scattered the remnants. The clock stopped at a time when it could not be repaired.

Has the lesson been learned? Have we grown capable of recognizing and avoiding dead-end projects? Anyone willing to recognize mistakes can acquire the necessary knowledge and perspective. Latin is a dead language and rightly so. The next time that someone asks you to participate in a project, make sure that it has a future.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by ellievanhoutte under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]