Saturday, 27 March 2010

The tide will turn today: don't miss it - The story of Grandma Moses (Part 3 of 5)



If you don't live in the United States of America, you may have never heard of Anna Mary Robertson Moses. She was popularly known as Grandma Moses and died in 1961, when she was 101 years old. Her days were spent working, initially for other people and later for herself.

During her life, Ms. Moses did farm work, cooked, washed clothes, raised her children, and made butter and embroideries. Her earnings remained modest for many decades, but she wasted no time complaining. She simply had too much to do, especially when she became a widow at 57.

Making embroideries kept her busy. It was the sort of work that she liked, a combination of creativity and routine, a challenge to her energies and imagination. Unfortunately, when she turned 76, arthritis prevented her from doing further needlework and she had to stop making embroideries.

Many people who reach that age give up whatever illusions they have left. They tell themselves that they can go no farther and fall pray to psychological immobility. Once they relinquish their will to live, their physical condition soon catches up with their attitude.

To be continued in Part 4

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by ajvhan under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

The tide will turn today: don't miss it - The story of Grandma Moses (Part 3 of 5)



If you don't live in the United States of America, you may have never heard of Anna Mary Robertson Moses. She was popularly known as Grandma Moses and died in 1961, when she was 101 years old. Her days were spent working, initially for other people and later for herself.

During her life, Ms. Moses did farm work, cooked, washed clothes, raised her children, and made butter and embroideries. Her earnings remained modest for many decades, but she wasted no time complaining. She simply had too much to do, especially when she became a widow at 57.

Making embroideries kept her busy. It was the sort of work that she liked, a combination of creativity and routine, a challenge to her energies and imagination. Unfortunately, when she turned 76, arthritis prevented her from doing further needlework and she had to stop making embroideries.

Many people who reach that age give up whatever illusions they have left. They tell themselves that they can go no farther and fall pray to psychological immobility. Once they relinquish their will to live, their physical condition soon catches up with their attitude.

To be continued in Part 4

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by ajvhan under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]