Saturday, 3 April 2010

Before you start rising, you need to stop falling (Part 2 of 4)


The desire to recover what has been lost is natural and healthy as long as it is not exacerbated by social pressure. Most psychological misery that accompanies critical problems is unnecessary. Emotional reactions can aggravate whatever losses we have incurred. Dismay can render victims deaf to common sense and blind to opportunity.

What is the reason of so much useless suffering? What makes people act against their interests? Why do they block their achievements? What's the point of placing additional obstacles on our way? Why does this phenomenon affect so many individuals?

Those negative consequences can be blamed on the myth of short-term radical improvement. Seldom has an idea wrecked so much havoc in the lives of millions of people. The victims of this wrong conviction are as numerous today as in previous centuries, showing that the lesson has not been learned from History.

A man who has been diagnosed with cancer will only inflict unnecessary suffering on himself if he compares his physical condition with that of an Olympic athlete. The stronger his hope to find a miraculous fix for his sickness, the deeper his anxiety. His conviction that short-term radical improvement is possible will intensify his disappointment when a solution fails to materialize.

To be continued in Part 3

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Crispin Swan under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]