Thursday, 20 May 2010

Can you advance faster by zigzagging? - Story of Leonardo da Vinci (Part 2 of 5)


Two weeks after your 67th birthday, your time is up. You find yourself terminally ill and look back on your life to see how much you have actually accomplished. When you count your material assets, you realize how little you possess after so many decades of work. When you review your output, you feel shame about how few items you have actually finished.

At that point, you cannot help thinking that you have wasted your life. What will remain of you after you are gone? Why have you squandered your talent in conjecture and speculation? You have started many projects but, on too many occasions, you have abandoned them half-way.

With trembling voice, you dictate your last will. Since you never married nor fathered any children, your possessions are to be divided amongst servants and friends. The house where you are about to die is also not yours. When you close your eyes for the last time, you beg for extra time to complete all works that you have left unfinished, but now, it is too late.

Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) died in a house that the King of France had made available to him. His last will, which was published after his death, names his meagre possessions. His wealth amounted to a few books, a piece of land in Milan, some money, and a few paintings. Not much for someone who many regard as the most talented man who has ever lived.

To be continued in Part 3

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by oliveheartkimchi under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Can you advance faster by zigzagging? - Story of Leonardo da Vinci (Part 2 of 5)


Two weeks after your 67th birthday, your time is up. You find yourself terminally ill and look back on your life to see how much you have actually accomplished. When you count your material assets, you realize how little you possess after so many decades of work. When you review your output, you feel shame about how few items you have actually finished.

At that point, you cannot help thinking that you have wasted your life. What will remain of you after you are gone? Why have you squandered your talent in conjecture and speculation? You have started many projects but, on too many occasions, you have abandoned them half-way.

With trembling voice, you dictate your last will. Since you never married nor fathered any children, your possessions are to be divided amongst servants and friends. The house where you are about to die is also not yours. When you close your eyes for the last time, you beg for extra time to complete all works that you have left unfinished, but now, it is too late.

Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) died in a house that the King of France had made available to him. His last will, which was published after his death, names his meagre possessions. His wealth amounted to a few books, a piece of land in Milan, some money, and a few paintings. Not much for someone who many regard as the most talented man who has ever lived.

To be continued in Part 3

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by oliveheartkimchi under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]