Sunday, 23 May 2010

Can you advance faster by zigzagging? - Story of Leonardo da Vinci (Part 5 of 5)


Raphael, who many consider one of the most talented painters in History, only lived 37 years, but authored more than a hundred paintings. In contrast, Leonardo, who lived to become 67 years old, only produced a few dozen works. How many other brilliant paintings could Leonardo have created if he had focused on this line of activity?

We know that Leonardo was perfectly aware of this problem, since he spent his life moving from one project to another. At 28, he interrupted his work on his painting “St. Jerome” and never found time to finish it. At 29, he went off to Milan and abandoned in Florence his half-way completed painting “Adoration of the Magi,” which he never retook.

At 40, Leonardo obtained a commission for an equestrian monument in Milan, but the project also remained uncompleted. Leonardo did manage to produce a horse clay model for the monument, but by the time the horse was ready to be cast in bronze, Leonardo's client decided to use the bronze to manufacture cannons.

Long-term achievement requires stable purpose. Zigzagging can also lead to success, but such success will tend to be of sort duration. Personal efforts, like investments, go farther when they are compounded through time. Each step of a career should consolidate yesterday's accomplishments and prepare the next. Permanent improvement requires psychological stability.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by firmatography under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Can you advance faster by zigzagging? - Story of Leonardo da Vinci (Part 5 of 5)


Raphael, who many consider one of the most talented painters in History, only lived 37 years, but authored more than a hundred paintings. In contrast, Leonardo, who lived to become 67 years old, only produced a few dozen works. How many other brilliant paintings could Leonardo have created if he had focused on this line of activity?

We know that Leonardo was perfectly aware of this problem, since he spent his life moving from one project to another. At 28, he interrupted his work on his painting “St. Jerome” and never found time to finish it. At 29, he went off to Milan and abandoned in Florence his half-way completed painting “Adoration of the Magi,” which he never retook.

At 40, Leonardo obtained a commission for an equestrian monument in Milan, but the project also remained uncompleted. Leonardo did manage to produce a horse clay model for the monument, but by the time the horse was ready to be cast in bronze, Leonardo's client decided to use the bronze to manufacture cannons.

Long-term achievement requires stable purpose. Zigzagging can also lead to success, but such success will tend to be of sort duration. Personal efforts, like investments, go farther when they are compounded through time. Each step of a career should consolidate yesterday's accomplishments and prepare the next. Permanent improvement requires psychological stability.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by firmatography under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]