Sunday, 30 May 2010

The best strategy for personal growth - Story of Alexander Cruden (Part 4 of 5)


When he was in his fifties, Alexander Cruden gave himself the surname “the Corrector” and petitioned the English Parliament to appoint him “Corrector of the Morals of the Nation.” Despite Cruden's sustained efforts to convince Members of Parliament to grant him this title, it was all to no avail.

Cruden's fixation with correctness reached such an extreme that, when he went out of his home, he carried a sponge with which he deleted any signs that he found in the street that he considered against good morals, grammar, or spelling. Such attitude led him to conflicts in which he defended his views with emphasis and determination.

His activities as self-appointed public corrector did secure Cruden a place in the list of History's great eccentrics, but contributed little to exploit his talents. Even if the man possessed genius, his obsession with righteousness did not produce a successful outcome.

To his advantage and that of posterity, Cruden simultaneously pursued his writing ambitions. When he was in his mid-thirties, he conceived the idea of a dictionary that would explain every concept in the Bible.

To be continued in Part 5

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by srqpix under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

The best strategy for personal growth - Story of Alexander Cruden (Part 4 of 5)


When he was in his fifties, Alexander Cruden gave himself the surname “the Corrector” and petitioned the English Parliament to appoint him “Corrector of the Morals of the Nation.” Despite Cruden's sustained efforts to convince Members of Parliament to grant him this title, it was all to no avail.

Cruden's fixation with correctness reached such an extreme that, when he went out of his home, he carried a sponge with which he deleted any signs that he found in the street that he considered against good morals, grammar, or spelling. Such attitude led him to conflicts in which he defended his views with emphasis and determination.

His activities as self-appointed public corrector did secure Cruden a place in the list of History's great eccentrics, but contributed little to exploit his talents. Even if the man possessed genius, his obsession with righteousness did not produce a successful outcome.

To his advantage and that of posterity, Cruden simultaneously pursued his writing ambitions. When he was in his mid-thirties, he conceived the idea of a dictionary that would explain every concept in the Bible.

To be continued in Part 5

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by srqpix under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]