Monday, 12 July 2010

How to protect your serenity against the negative bias of daily news (Part 3 of 6)


How did they achieve such independence in their thinking? What are the keys behind their psychological stability? Do these people possess special genetic characteristics or does their behaviour denote a learned response? How can we protect our serenity against the negative bias of daily news? The following four ideas can help you preserve your peace of mind:

[1] Transform risks into numbers: Most reported threats refer to events that, most likely, will never happen. Every few years, newspapers discuss the possibility of an asteroid hitting the Earth and destroying millions of human lives.

Undoubtedly, such calamity would be terrible, but a wise man does not allow vague menaces to disrupt his tranquillity. Instead of losing sleep over risks, you should transform them into numbers or percentages. What are the actual chances of an asteroid hitting the town where you live? If the result of the calculation is one in a million, how much are you willing to worry?

[2] Set a limit on damages: Companies operating in consumer markets incur incessant risks of civil liability and litigation. If you deliver products to millions of people, an accident will occur sooner or later. At one point, electrical components may burn or mechanical systems fail.

To be continued in Part 4

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by PhillipC under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

How to protect your serenity against the negative bias of daily news (Part 3 of 6)


How did they achieve such independence in their thinking? What are the keys behind their psychological stability? Do these people possess special genetic characteristics or does their behaviour denote a learned response? How can we protect our serenity against the negative bias of daily news? The following four ideas can help you preserve your peace of mind:

[1] Transform risks into numbers: Most reported threats refer to events that, most likely, will never happen. Every few years, newspapers discuss the possibility of an asteroid hitting the Earth and destroying millions of human lives.

Undoubtedly, such calamity would be terrible, but a wise man does not allow vague menaces to disrupt his tranquillity. Instead of losing sleep over risks, you should transform them into numbers or percentages. What are the actual chances of an asteroid hitting the town where you live? If the result of the calculation is one in a million, how much are you willing to worry?

[2] Set a limit on damages: Companies operating in consumer markets incur incessant risks of civil liability and litigation. If you deliver products to millions of people, an accident will occur sooner or later. At one point, electrical components may burn or mechanical systems fail.

To be continued in Part 4

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by PhillipC under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]