Wednesday, 20 October 2010

Never forget to ask the price (Part 2 of 3)


How long is your list of those who look around and compare offers? What percentage of men and women carefully assess cost before making decisions? If you write down names, chances are that they will be few, since whole segments of the population prefer to ignore price information:

* CHILDREN are foreign to cost considerations, since their priority is to have everything right now, irrespective of the price. Instilling sound economic judgement should be one of the objectives of a good education. Psychological growth demands perception of the bond between effort and reward.

* SMOKERS must be also excluded from any list of cost-conscious individuals. How many of them are unaware of their increased health risks? Anyone who watches television or reads newspapers can hardly claim ignorance of the massive cost of cancer treatment.

* COMPLAINERS spend their days deploring problems which, on closer examination, could have been easily avoided by looking at the market. Depressed prices or exaggerated valuations do not prompt rational men to lamentation, but to cautious action.

To be continued in Part 3

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by markus941 under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Never forget to ask the price (Part 2 of 3)


How long is your list of those who look around and compare offers? What percentage of men and women carefully assess cost before making decisions? If you write down names, chances are that they will be few, since whole segments of the population prefer to ignore price information:

* CHILDREN are foreign to cost considerations, since their priority is to have everything right now, irrespective of the price. Instilling sound economic judgement should be one of the objectives of a good education. Psychological growth demands perception of the bond between effort and reward.

* SMOKERS must be also excluded from any list of cost-conscious individuals. How many of them are unaware of their increased health risks? Anyone who watches television or reads newspapers can hardly claim ignorance of the massive cost of cancer treatment.

* COMPLAINERS spend their days deploring problems which, on closer examination, could have been easily avoided by looking at the market. Depressed prices or exaggerated valuations do not prompt rational men to lamentation, but to cautious action.

To be continued in Part 3

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by markus941 under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]