Monday, 20 December 2010

The way of self-reliance (Part 1 of 3)


There are reasons enough in the world to feel worried and concerned. Nonsense and injustice, ignorance and prejudice, just to name a few. Mistakes are made day after day, frequently out of kindness and in good faith, although such excuses are poor consolations to people on the receiving end.

Should one choose to feel stressed? The answer to this question will depend on what you want to achieve. Let us not underestimate the appeal of rightful indignation. Complaining makes you feel important, gives free rein to your emotions, and gets you closer to like-minded plaintiffs or outraged defendants.

Anger increases your energy and keeps you alert, but it has substantial drawbacks. More often than not, obfuscation will blind you to reality and lead you to discard relevant facts. You will misjudge people and situations, attributing ill-intent where only negligence exists. In most cases, strong emotional reactions will result in waste. This is how it happens.

To be continued in Part 2

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Andreanna under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

The way of self-reliance (Part 1 of 3)


There are reasons enough in the world to feel worried and concerned. Nonsense and injustice, ignorance and prejudice, just to name a few. Mistakes are made day after day, frequently out of kindness and in good faith, although such excuses are poor consolations to people on the receiving end.

Should one choose to feel stressed? The answer to this question will depend on what you want to achieve. Let us not underestimate the appeal of rightful indignation. Complaining makes you feel important, gives free rein to your emotions, and gets you closer to like-minded plaintiffs or outraged defendants.

Anger increases your energy and keeps you alert, but it has substantial drawbacks. More often than not, obfuscation will blind you to reality and lead you to discard relevant facts. You will misjudge people and situations, attributing ill-intent where only negligence exists. In most cases, strong emotional reactions will result in waste. This is how it happens.

To be continued in Part 2

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Andreanna under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]