Tuesday, 18 January 2011

In praise of low-key marketing (Part 1 of 4)


In the last five decades, management thinkers have reflected and debated on how to increase the effectiveness of organizations. Different theories have been put forward, argued, and often withdrawn. Even nowadays, only a couple of management precepts enjoy universal acceptance. The bottleneck principle is one of those few.

This rule predicts that the positive short-term benefits of any action will always be the greatest when efforts are focused on removing a bottleneck from a process. For instance, when the production of furniture is being slowed down by assembly difficulties, such bottleneck could be removed by using a simpler fastening procedure.

This formula has been applied successfully thousands of times to speed up manufacturing and service operations. On the other hand, its application has been rare in the field of marketing and sales. In general, entrepreneurs find easier to create new products than finding customers willing to purchase them.

To be continued in Part 2

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by kimdokhac under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

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