Sunday, 12 June 2011

Applying entrepreneurship to personal relationships (Part 1 of 11)


Aristotle was a great philosopher, but entrepreneurship was one thing that he never managed to understand.

In the Nicomachean Ethics, his essay on justice and morality, he views society as a market where human desires are stable, where the demand for each product is constant, and each purchase has a predictable price.

One does not need to look at the world for long to rate Aristotle's view as highly unrealistic. The truth is that, in the field of work and commerce, prices vary incessantly.

New products appear daily on the market. Growing ventures create jobs, while old-fashioned industries are reducing the number of their employees. Trading conditions change, markets move, and money circulates

To be continued in the next post.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by ryemang under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Applying entrepreneurship to personal relationships (Part 1 of 11)


Aristotle was a great philosopher, but entrepreneurship was one thing that he never managed to understand.

In the Nicomachean Ethics, his essay on justice and morality, he views society as a market where human desires are stable, where the demand for each product is constant, and each purchase has a predictable price.

One does not need to look at the world for long to rate Aristotle's view as highly unrealistic. The truth is that, in the field of work and commerce, prices vary incessantly.

New products appear daily on the market. Growing ventures create jobs, while old-fashioned industries are reducing the number of their employees. Trading conditions change, markets move, and money circulates

To be continued in the next post.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by ryemang under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]