Sunday, 26 June 2011

Six methods to reduce your investment risk (Part 2 of 8)


"If you intend to climb a high mountain, always choose the smoothest path," wrote Chinese philosopher Lao-Tzu in the year 520 BC.

In times of economic adversity, investing becomes the equivalent of climbing the Swiss Alps bare-handed in the middle of the winter.

After suffering the negative results of wrong financial decisions, many individuals are reluctant to place any money in the stock market. Are those fears justified?

Making mistakes is inevitable in any human endeavour. A wise man must be willing to accept occasional errors and use them as stepping-stones for building a better future for himself. Why should we not view the stock market in the same way?

To be continued in the next post.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by alisamii under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Six methods to reduce your investment risk
(Part 2 of 8)


"If you intend to climb a high mountain, always choose the smoothest path," wrote Chinese philosopher Lao-Tzu in the year 520 BC.

In times of economic adversity, investing becomes the equivalent of climbing the Swiss Alps bare-handed in the middle of the winter.

After suffering the negative results of wrong financial decisions, many individuals are reluctant to place any money in the stock market. Are those fears justified?

Making mistakes is inevitable in any human endeavour. A wise man must be willing to accept occasional errors and use them as stepping-stones for building a better future for himself. Why should we not view the stock market in the same way?

To be continued in the next post.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by alisamii under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]