Monday, 25 July 2011

Using reason to contest overblown concerns (Part 2 of 8)


Worry and anxiety are powerful inhibitors of achievement.

Fear can make us discard viable initiatives; apprehension may consume our energies and prevent us from moving forward; concern can block reasonable attempts to improve our situation.

We stay behind because our minds blow risks out of proportion.

We give up too soon because we underestimate our capacity to adopt preventive measures; we walk downtrodden paths for fear of lions that we have never seen; we stick to unproductive routines to avoid the discomfort associated with change.

To be continued in the next post.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Mara 1 under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Using reason to contest overblown concerns
(Part 2 of 8)


Worry and anxiety are powerful inhibitors of achievement.

Fear can make us discard viable initiatives; apprehension may consume our energies and prevent us from moving forward; concern can block reasonable attempts to improve our situation.

We stay behind because our minds blow risks out of proportion.

We give up too soon because we underestimate our capacity to adopt preventive measures; we walk downtrodden paths for fear of lions that we have never seen; we stick to unproductive routines to avoid the discomfort associated with change.

To be continued in the next post.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Mara 1 under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Using reason to contest overblown concerns (Part 1 of 8)


Imagine for a moment that you would able to go after your goals without having to fear criticism from friends and family.

Would you devote more efforts to pursuing your ambitions if you did not have to worry about ridicule in case of failure? How far would you invest yourself if you never had to deal with discouragement and doubts?

There are good reasons why we fear failure more than we crave success.


If we formulate the proposition in purely material terms, the discomfort suffered from not having any car is far superior than the advantages derived from having two cars.

S
imilarly, the terror of losing all our savings in a stock market crash is stronger than the perspective of doubling our assets if stock prices rise.

To be continued in the next post.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by ConsciousVision under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

Using reason to contest overblown concerns
(Part 1 of 8)


Imagine for a moment that you would able to go after your goals without having to fear criticism from friends and family.

Would you devote more efforts to pursuing your ambitions if you did not have to worry about ridicule in case of failure? How far would you invest yourself if you never had to deal with discouragement and doubts?

There are good reasons why we fear failure more than we crave success.


If we formulate the proposition in purely material terms, the discomfort suffered from not having any car is far superior than the advantages derived from having two cars.

S
imilarly, the terror of losing all our savings in a stock market crash is stronger than the perspective of doubling our assets if stock prices rise.

To be continued in the next post.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by ConsciousVision under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]