Monday, 26 September 2011

A change for the better (Part 2 of 9)

Although the overall tone of the essay is cautious and conservative, readers noticed Freud's underlying criticism.

Reviewers of the book had no problem with Freud's listening to patients and interpreting their dreams, but his latest opinions were out of the question. The essay generated such opposition that Freud never addressed similar subjects again.

Many decades have passed, but tradition has not lost any of its force. Its tentacles feed on the weak in order to starve the independent; it silences doubts and paralyses initiative; it renders questions inaudible and self-reliance unthinkable.

To be continued in the next post.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Mikerhoads under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

A change for the better (Part 2 of 9)

Although the overall tone of the essay is cautious and conservative, readers noticed Freud's underlying criticism.

Reviewers of the book had no problem with Freud's listening to patients and interpreting their dreams, but his latest opinions were out of the question. The essay generated such opposition that Freud never addressed similar subjects again.

Many decades have passed, but tradition has not lost any of its force. Its tentacles feed on the weak in order to starve the independent; it silences doubts and paralyses initiative; it renders questions inaudible and self-reliance unthinkable.

To be continued in the next post.

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Mikerhoads under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]