Monday, 13 March 2017

Do not let the 80/20 principle mislead you

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Personal development, as it is understood today, consists of a constant search for shortcuts: How to be more effective. How to be happier. How to earn more money. How to improve your relationships. How to learn faster. How to get ahead.

As a result, a new shortcut becomes fashionable each year: Psychoanalysis. Gestalt therapy. Positive thinking. The law of attraction. The placebo effect. New age. Spirituality. The power of pyramids. Mediation. Tibetan yoga.

If you have tried out any those shortcuts, you must have already figured out their limitations. Fragmentary philosophies lead to fragmentary results. Confusion engenders more confusion. You don't get the right answers by silencing the questions.

The 80/20 principle constitutes the ultimate shortcut. According to this principle, you can render your life more efficient if you focus on your 20% most critical activities. You can multiply your earnings if you concentrate on your 20% most productive tasks. You can be happier if you spend most of your time with your very best friends.

However, none of those shortcuts, not even the 80/20 principle, is going to tell you how to determine your lifetime goals, choose meaningful activities, and select your friends wisely. What would be the point of becoming more efficient at doing the wrong thing? Why would you want to advance faster if you don't know where you are going?

Do not let the 80/20 principle mislead you. Do not make your future success and happiness depend on the shortcut that happens to be fashionable this week. The only way to determine wisely your long-term goals is to adopt a rational philosophy. And the best way to reach those goals is to think for yourself.

Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com

Image: photograph of classical painting; photograph taken by John Vespasian, 2016.

For more information about rational living, I refer you to my books

 
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