Friday, 3 March 2017

How animals make decisions, and mostly get them right


Millions of people are afraid of taking decisions. They agonize for years about things they know they should be doing, but cannot find the time to do. They wish they could gather the courage, the resources, and determination to get rid of old habits, and go into a new direction. They wish they could explore new avenues, but they seem unable to deviate from their routines.

Indecision and fear of the unknown are universal phenomena. To a larger or lesser extent, everybody is afraid of changing his habits, disrupting his life, and losing what he has. Yet, we all realize that we cannot grow without taking risks, making ourselves uncomfortable, and committing occasional errors.

I have found a solution to push myself over the line, and take those initial, risky steps that can lead to better things. This is a technique I learned from watching animals in nature. Look how young animals decide whether unknown food is good to eat, whether they can explore some new territory, or climb a higher tree.

They don't spend months agonizing about the possible negative consequences, the possible failure and ensuing ridicule. What they do is simply to take a small step, try out the new experience, and see what happens. They take a small bite of the new food, and look around nervously at the new territory. They quickly check out if the new thing is going to work or not. If the adventure proves promising, they go ahead. If it doesn't, they simply take a step back, and return to their old routine.

In my experience, this method can allow you to make 75% of your decisions quickly, and mostly get them right. You don't need to take huge, decisive steps, and put your livelihood on the line. You don't need to risk losing your family, your health, and your reputation. Leave those spectacular life-or-death decisions for movies, novels, and poetry.

High-risk adventures belong to fiction, and that's where they should remain. Human beings usually do better in life if they behave prudently and rationally. More often than not, you will do better if you take a low-risk approach, and increase your bet as you go along. And if the project doesn't work as you expected, you don't need to turn the bad experience into a big deal. Simply cut your losses, and move on.

Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com

Image: photograph of ancient Egyptian sculpture; photograph taken by John Vespasian, 2017.

For more information about rational living, I refer you to my books

 
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A simple but effective way to protect your peace of mind

Here are the links to three interviews, just published, about my latest book "Thriving in Difficult Times: Twelve Lessons from Ancient Greece to Improve Your Life Today." 

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Chances are that your life will go through a major upheaval in the next years. Such disruption might be of a nature that you cannot imagine at present. New technology may render your job obsolete. Global competition could devalue your education. A major economic shift might put you out of business.

Substraction becomes addition

Luckily, there is a simple way to protect yourself. All you have to do is to adopt a frugal lifestyle. Reducing your present cost of living can be achieved in many ways, for example, by spending less money on food, lodging, transportation, energy, travel, entertainment, or insurance

The resulting subtraction from your present enjoyment will be more than compensated by gains in long-term security. Commit yourself to save regularly in order to create a margin of safety. Accumulated resources will allow you to face calmly any disaster that the future may bring.

A man who feels confident and serene makes more of his days than an anxious short-term thinker. Too many are those who live under the threat of a mounting pile of debt. They are paying a high price for giving away their independence in exchange for momentary pleasure.

The delusion of stability

Do not fall prey to the delusion of stability. Reduce your current cost of living and create a financial reserve for difficult times because, sooner or later, they will come. If you are undecided about what expenditures to cut, make a linear reduction of 5% in all your budgets and take it from there.

In addition, it is a good idea to have a back-up financial plan for unforeseen situations. For example, no matter how good your health insurance is, its coverage won't be universal. Similarly, your protection in the field of liability indemnity might be less than you think. What would happen if, due to some unfortunate event, you were to lose your protection altogether? Do you have a back-up plan?

Overspending is frequently caused by overconfidence. People feel sure that nothing bad can happen to them. They overestimate their strengths and underestimate their risks. They place their future at jeopardy in order to enjoy transient advantages that will be quickly forgotten.

You will be better off if you reduce your current costs. Aim at creating an emergency fund to which you can resort in times of need. Even a modest financial reserve can do wonders to alleviate misfortune or adversity. Discard the delusion of invulnerability and assess your risks objectively. Make the commitment to save at least 5% of your net income every month.

The psychological benefits

Furthermore, leading a prudent and modest lifestyle has strong can deliver important ethical benefits. Do you believe that all ethical decisions are equally valid? Are individuals who save to buy a home morally equivalent to those who gamble away their salary? Would you take a loan to finance your medical studies in the same spirit as you would borrow cash to purchase a recreational boat?

Rational values align decisions with reality, leading man to certainty and prosperity. In contrast, relativism wears man down by trying to justify arbitrary choices. Happiness needs to be sustained by facts, not by excuses. Personal well-being cannot be maintained by means of inconsistent behaviour.

Creating safety for yourself

Frugality goes hand in hand with logic and realism. You will enjoy life more if you reduce your living costs and create financial safety for yourself. Pick up pen and paper and make a list of ten items of expenditure that you can cut without any negative impact on your lifestyle.

Make more with less by adopting an entrepreneurial approach to life. If you are committed to search for better alternatives, you will find them. If you remain alert to better opportunities, you will seize them. Give priority to safety over short-term pleasure. Serenity and self-confidence will be the result. Reduce your costs and enjoy life more.

Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com

Image by Alaskan Dude under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us 

For more information about rational living, I refer you to my books

 
Free subscription to The John Vespasian Letter