Saturday, 13 December 2008

The inconsistency of the squirrel


"Five hours should be enough," estimated Louis Theron. "I have trained much worse animals than this."

The advertising executive, unconvinced,
nodded to Theron. "If you need more squirrels, just let me know," he replied.

Theron shook his head, considering the matter settled. He had promised to train the squirrel in five hours and he was going to do it, no matter what.

The advertising executive went away, leaving Louis Theron alone with the squirrel. Theron consulted his watch and put on his thick leather gloves.

He opened the lid of the carton box lying on the floor and carefully took the squirrel out of the box. "You'll see, my little beast. We are going to become good friends," Theron told the squirrel. He caressed softly the squirrel's fur, while he explained in simple words what he was expecting from the animal.

"You are going to be the star in a TV commercial about pizza. All you have to do is walk to the pizza, sniff at it contentedly, turn to the camera, and smile." The squirrel, absolutely indifferent to Theron's words, looked around the room with curiosity.

Theron opened the pizza box that was lying on the table and set the squirrel next to the pizza. "Remember. Walk to the pizza, sniff, turn around, and smile to the camera."

Five hours later, the advertising executive returned to the room and asked Theron how he was doing. "It's done," replied Theron. "The squirrel is ready to perform. You can tell the cameraman to come in."

With incredulous eyes, the advertising executive contemplated the squirrel. The animal walked on the table, stood still beside the pizza, sniffed at it, turned around, and smiled. "How on earth did you get the squirrel to do that?" he wanted to know.

Theron caressed the squirrel's back before answering. "The problem with squirrels is their inconsistency. Besides, they are incredibly stubborn. This is why I needed five hours. Ten minutes for the actual training and the rest of the time for convincing the squirrel."


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Gilles Gonthier under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

The inconsistency of the squirrel


"Five hours should be enough," estimated Louis Theron. "I have trained much worse animals than this."

The advertising executive, unconvinced,
nodded to Theron. "If you need more squirrels, just let me know," he replied.

Theron shook his head, considering the matter settled. He had promised to train the squirrel in five hours and he was going to do it, no matter what.

The advertising executive went away, leaving Louis Theron alone with the squirrel. Theron consulted his watch and put on his thick leather gloves.

He opened the lid of the carton box lying on the floor and carefully took the squirrel out of the box. "You'll see, my little beast. We are going to become good friends," Theron told the squirrel. He caressed softly the squirrel's fur, while he explained in simple words what he was expecting from the animal.

"You are going to be the star in a TV commercial about pizza. All you have to do is walk to the pizza, sniff at it contentedly, turn to the camera, and smile." The squirrel, absolutely indifferent to Theron's words, looked around the room with curiosity.

Theron opened the pizza box that was lying on the table and set the squirrel next to the pizza. "Remember. Walk to the pizza, sniff, turn around, and smile to the camera."

Five hours later, the advertising executive returned to the room and asked Theron how he was doing. "It's done," replied Theron. "The squirrel is ready to perform. You can tell the cameraman to come in."

With incredulous eyes, the advertising executive contemplated the squirrel. The animal walked on the table, stood still beside the pizza, sniffed at it, turned around, and smiled. "How on earth did you get the squirrel to do that?" he wanted to know.

Theron caressed the squirrel's back before answering. "The problem with squirrels is their inconsistency. Besides, they are incredibly stubborn. This is why I needed five hours. Ten minutes for the actual training and the rest of the time for convincing the squirrel."


[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by Gilles Gonthier under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]