Friday, 4 December 2009

The five daughters of Johann Sebastian


"No," said Johann Sebastian, irritated. "After all the trouble that I have gone through in order to give you an education, I am not going to allow you to marry a baker."

Pensively, Annette listened to the words of her father. She was trying her best to understand the old man's logic. "Edmund is not a baker, father," she replied calmly. "He makes chocolate."

Johann Sebastian stood up, walked to the window, and looked outside. The first villagers were already entering the church. The Sunday service was due to start in ten minutes. The truth is that Johann Sebastian was feeling in no mood to play the organ.

His conversation with his youngest daughter Annette was upsetting him more that he let it show. Why did Annette have to be so rebellious? Johann Sebastian had arranged good marriages for his other four daughters, but Annette had rejected all suitors presented by her father.

"Chocolate is just a fashion," Johann Sebastian retorted angrily, as he turned around and faced his daughter. "You and your baker Edmund will starve, and then what, who will take care of your children?"

Annette smiled, realizing that her father had already accepted her choice of husband as inevitable. "You don't understand, father. Times are changing. People want to try new things to eat. One day, Edmund says, people will eat chocolate everyday."

She walked to her father, stood still by his side, and kissed him softly. "Will you play the organ in our wedding?" she begged. Johann Sebastian pressed his lips and contemplated his daughter in silence. The bells of the church gave the last announcement. The Sunday service was about to start.

Johann Sebastian caressed his daughter's hair. "How foolish you are, Annette. Yes, you can marry Edmund, but he has to promise me first that he will become a regular baker and forget about chocolate."

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by blmurch under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]

The five daughters of Johann Sebastian


"No," said Johann Sebastian, irritated. "After all the trouble that I have gone through in order to give you an education, I am not going to allow you to marry a baker."

Pensively, Annette listened to the words of her father. She was trying her best to understand the old man's logic. "Edmund is not a baker, father," she replied calmly. "He makes chocolate."

Johann Sebastian stood up, walked to the window, and looked outside. The first villagers were already entering the church. The Sunday service was due to start in ten minutes. The truth is that Johann Sebastian was feeling in no mood to play the organ.

His conversation with his youngest daughter Annette was upsetting him more that he let it show. Why did Annette have to be so rebellious? Johann Sebastian had arranged good marriages for his other four daughters, but Annette had rejected all suitors presented by her father.

"Chocolate is just a fashion," Johann Sebastian retorted angrily, as he turned around and faced his daughter. "You and your baker Edmund will starve, and then what, who will take care of your children?"

Annette smiled, realizing that her father had already accepted her choice of husband as inevitable. "You don't understand, father. Times are changing. People want to try new things to eat. One day, Edmund says, people will eat chocolate everyday."

She walked to her father, stood still by his side, and kissed him softly. "Will you play the organ in our wedding?" she begged. Johann Sebastian pressed his lips and contemplated his daughter in silence. The bells of the church gave the last announcement. The Sunday service was about to start.

Johann Sebastian caressed his daughter's hair. "How foolish you are, Annette. Yes, you can marry Edmund, but he has to promise me first that he will become a regular baker and forget about chocolate."

[Text: http://johnvespasian.blogspot.com]

[Image by blmurch under Creative Commons Attribution License. See the license terms under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us]